Stockholm Arlanda Airport

Incheon Airport South Korea Evaluates European A-CDM

Being an advocate of best practices to implement airport collaborative decision making implies agenda flexibility, and investing ample time to allow A-CDM candidates to grasp the concept of A-CDM as it is practiced in live operations. Be it after business hours for a small party of Romanian air traffic control, on their way back to Bucharest, or for the complete stakeholder group of Stockholm Arlanda airport on a one-day visit, or for a delegation of Single European Sky experts of the European Commission's Directorate General Move - Mobility & Transport. A couple of weeks ago, we had the honour to host a team of 5 from South Korea's Incheon International Airport, on a European A-CDM familiarization trip. ICN/RKSI, South Korea's main airport and among Asia's biggest 6, seems to be securing the 'World's best airport' award by Airports Council International year after year, and is now seriously considering efficiency and capacity optimizing measures by adopting the European airport stakeholder collaboration model. Project horizon is mid 2017, running along yet another dazzling construction project.

First Stop: Preparation

Since we have the habit of preparing thoroughly for each visit, we like to scan our visitors' level of A-CDM knowledge beforehand. That way, we avoid the risk of stating the obvious in the presentations, or 'losing' them at an early stage and giving the impression of talking double Dutch after a while.

We were forwarded an extensive presentation, which proved that the Eurocontrol concept elements and milestones had been surprisingly well studied. Unsurprisingly, the Incheon party was delegated by the ICT department of the airport operator and an ICT service provider, and aimed at understanding the 'A-CDM system' of Brussels Airport. After introductions, upon explaining to them that there is none, they were slightly taken aback, but nevertheless they engaged enthusiastically in a packed one-day A-CDM airport tour across 4 stakeholders.

So, talking double Dutch was never an issue, but understanding plain English was a bit tougher. Luckily, the Incheon party brought along an interpreter who really went out of his way to understand and translate almost simultaneously. He must have been exhausted by the end of the day...

Brussels Airport

Second Stop: In the Field

Brussels Airport isn't much in favor of explaining A-CDM in the classroom. It is understood at best when witnessing it enrolling in operations. So after an opening presentation on our interpretation of the A-CDM concept by ourselves, we don our safety jackets and go out.

We scheduled a concise presentation on departure planning information exchange between our ANSP and the Network Manager, presented by the Belgocontrol team, and try for a visit to the Delivery position in the tower for a brief exchange of thoughts on departure sequencing (which we usually manage in off-peak moments).

A-CDM

Next up is a visit to the A-CDM working positions of one of our home carriers and main ground handlers, each in turn explaining their approach on Collaborative Decision Making, the way procedures and data elements were integrated in their operations, and got adopted by all staff over time. The dreaded culture change...

In this way, we almost always achieve the goal we have in mind at the start of every familiarization visit: to let our visitors discover for themselves how A-CDM blends into day-to-day operations on an airport, and how the concept pops up in the procedures and technical solutions at each stakeholder. It's definitely worth the preparation and the required agenda space.

Lastly, Taking Up the challenge

The Incheon A-CDM team gave themselves 3 years to deliver a data sharing platform, which in my opinion shouldn't pose any major problems. However, there are some concerns about stakeholder commitment, and they left us with lots of things to consider on that subject, on data disclosure and responsibilities.

Although Incheon Airport  is known for sporting an 18-hole golf course, it may well be that putting Airport Collaborative Decision Making into business will turn out to be a different ball game...

What is your take on A-CDM at non-European airports? Unlike Europe, there is no option to interlink airport operations in a network manager controlled environment, thus lacking the 'netwoHence, does local capacity optimization justify substantial investments in collaborative decision making technology and culture change?

Editor's Note We will be on holiday in August and back with a new blog post in September. The New Airport Insider team thanks you for your readership and wishes you a great summer!

 

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A-CDM Get Together at Heathrow Airport

A-CDM, Airport CDM Left to right: Rodolphe Linais from Aéroports de Paris - A-CDM at Charles de Gaulle Airport / Ruud van Ooij from KLM - A-CDM* de-icing project at Schiphol Airport / Hans Kelder from KLM Ground Services - A-CDM* de-icing project at Schiphol Airport /  Timo Suorto from Finavia - A-CDM at Helsinki Airport / Antonio Nuzzo from ENAV - A-CDM at Roma Fiumicino Airport / Paul Wiegant from KLM - A-CDM* de-icing project at Schiphol Airport / Fabian Brühwiler from Zürich Airport - A-CDM at Zürich Airport / Kris De Bolle from Brussels Airport Company - A-CDM at Brussels Airport / Åsa Göransson from Swedavia - A-CDM* project at Stockholm Arlanda Airport / Steffen Günther-Schmitz from Fraport - A-CDM at Frankfurt Airport / Linda Gerritsen from Flughafen Düsseldorf - A-CDM at Düsseldorf Airport / Ronald Heyne from DFS - A-CDM at Düsseldorf Airport / John Crook from NATS - A-CDM at London Heathow Airport / Jenny Hossen from Heathrow Airport Ltd. - A-CDM at London Heathrow Airport.  *pre-implementation phase, or locally implemented

A-CDM at London Heathrow Airport

Winter Conditions Chat

Upon invitation by Heathrow Airport Ltd., the bulk of European A-CDM airports called at LHR on May 6th 2014 for a de-icing procedures meeting, kindly hosted by the UK's air navigation services provider NATS, in their sleek control tower building at Europe's busiest airport. In fact, we were only missing out on Norway's Oslo Gardermoen Airport, Spain's Madrid Barajas Airport out of the AENA network and Munich Airport, the latter being represented by Steffen and Linda, who also acted as governance members of 'ACDM Germany', the harmonization initiative of the German A-CDM airports.

A_CDM, Airport CDM

An Ounce of Practice is Worth a Ton of Theory

The purpose of the meeting was to benchmark our various aircraft de-icing procedures in place, or on the drawing board, and to share best practices on how to tackle this most challenging implementation step. Heathrow set the scene with a couple of impressive facts: a 90/10 ratio on-stand/remote de-icing, executed by approximately 67 de-icing trucks of a dazzling 8 de-icing companies... To be honest, the  knowledge that 90% of flights in Heathrow's massive departure sequence are de-iced at their parking stand and need to make the runway holding point before the de-icing fluid loses its effect gave me sweaty palms!

But all gets neatly policed by sharing the data on the progress of operations in a centralized common situational awareness tool, along the Eurocontrol defined de-icing milestones, or the 'z-times' as I like to call them (because practically every de-icing acronym holds the letter 'z'), providing vital information on planned and actual start and end of de-icing jobs. Which tool? Never mind, this meeting focused on procedures: who puts in which information at what time, and how to make this process as straightforward and transparent as possible. Remember Steve Jobs: 'You have to start with the customer experience and work back toward the technology - not the other way around'.

Common Sense

There has been lots of fuss and buzz about procedure harmonization and/or standardisation of A-CDM procedures. Mostly the lack of it, that is. Mainly legacy carriers tend to use this as an alibi for not engaging fully into collaborative decision making, and although not exactly intellectually honest, I cannot blame them entirely; the fear of being confronted with as many procedure and parameter deviations as there will be A-CDM airports is not unreal, and things could spin out of control when complex de-icing procedures come into play.

But as the discussion in Heathrow went along, I noticed a peculiar thing: instead of finding ourselves trapped in our own little logic -and boy, do we have a history with that, remembering the harmonization task force meetings at Eurocontrol...- a dose of common sense at each A-CDM airport individually led to new data exchange procedures (locally, and with the Network Manager) that grew 'organically' and ended up to be harmonized to quite a large extent, almost to our own surprise.

Not There Yet...

Ironically, European winter was exceptionally mild. Now that many of us put in a lot of hard work on brand new procedures, or wanted to fine tune earlier efforts like Frankfurt, there simply was no relevant weather for us to put our set-ups to the test. So, a bit of group therapy in Heathrow as well; it's comforting to know that you're not the only one that is anxiously looking out to next winter season...

Let's Take it from Here

I had the impression that, ever since the conclusion of the Eurocontrol harmonization task force meeting sequence last summer, we A-CDM airports were kind of waiting for the dust to settle. However, it's of utmost importance that we touch base regularly to discuss future developments and steer current operations, fill out the gaps and close the missing links. So, kudos for Jenny's team at Heathrow Airport Ltd. for taking the initiative to organize this get together. To be continued, I would say. In fact, by broadening the scope of the meeting to general implementation procedures, we could accomodate more airports in A-CDM start-up mode on their way to full implementation. After all there's no point in reinventing the wheel, is there?

Editor's Note Do you want to underwrite a post like this? Contact the editor at hello[at]dcdesigntech.com

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